Have one clear goal per page, and align your content to that goal.

We talked before about the most common real estate website mistake: a lack of focus. What do we mean by a lack of focus? Not having a single, clear outcome that you want to happen when someone visits each page on your website.

Having one clear goal per page allows you to focus all the content on that page towards a single marketing objective. It does wonders to increase conversions and enables you to measure performance (which is necessary improve your results).

Think of a website like any other marketing effort that you may do. When you send out a batch of postcards to an area, you want people to call your office. When you cold call a group of expired listings, you want people to schedule a follow-up meeting about your seller services. Why should your website be any different?

It sounds quite simple to determine just one desired outcome per page. However in practice, it’s all too easy to get lost in the details and end up with a jumbled mess. A website needs to do many different things, and sticking with a single goal per page can become problematic if you’re not careful.

How to determine what the goal of each page should be:

First, ask yourself the fundamental question: Why would someone visit your website? When you write down each reason, be sure to include the type of person behind the reason. For example:

A prospective homebuyer will look for more info about a specific property.

Second, for each reason that someone would visit your website, write down what would be the desired outcome. For example:

A prospective homebuyer will look for more info about a specific property:Schedule a meeting to visit the property

As you can see, a clear objective is starting to emerge. But some prospective buyers might not be ready to schedule a meeting just yet. So you need to add in a fallback plan, so you don’t completely lose them as a potential lead.

A prospective homebuyer will look for more info about a specific property:Schedule a meeting to visit the property. If not, sign up for email updates about similar properties.

All of the content on the page should still be focused on your main objective. The fallback plan is there to collect potential leads that need a bit more nurturing before taking the next step. Here is a more filled out example:

  1. A prospective homebuyer will look for more info about a specific property: Schedule a meeting to visit the property. If not, sign up for email updates about similar properties.
  2. A prospective homebuyer will look for more info about properties in a specific area/price range/size: Schedule a time to tour similar properties. If not, sign up for email updates about similar properties.
  3. A prospective home seller will try to determine if you are the best company to represent their home: Schedule a meeting for a seller’s consultation. If not, subscribe to blog updates that demonstrate your real estate expertise.
  4. Someone not ready to buy or sell yet will read an interesting article on your blog: Share your post on social media to grow your audience. If not, subscribe to future blog updates.

Finally, you simply map each page on your website to one of the reasons that someone would visit your website. Keep in mind the same reason can be used for multiple pages. Once you’ve determined the single objective for each page, you’ll have taken the most important step to making a website that produces results.

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